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LGBTQ Center

Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer and Questioning Center

LGBTQ Course Offerings

Fall 2015:

WGS 377B/677BG or HST372 Queer Public Histories (3 hr)
Angela Mazaris
Tuesday/Thursday 12:30 – 1:45 pm

This hands-on course explores how public history projects (oral histories, museums, archives, documentaries) document gay, lesbian, transgender, and queer communities in the U.S. We will discuss how historical and contemporary LGBTQ stories have been collected, and we will examine the various queer identities that emerge through this process. Students will conduct oral histories with LGBTQ Wake Forest alumni, and will create a public history exhibit of their own. Approved for WGS Public Engagement requirement.

 

For more currently offered LGBTQ-relevant courses, visit the WGS course listings.

Previously Offered:


WGS 377D  Special Topics: Communicating Across Differences: LGBTQ and Allies Peer Education (3 hr)
Angela Mazaris
Monday/Wednesday  12:30-1:45 pm

Fall 2012

This is an experiental learning course that seeks to combat homophobia, transphobia, and heterosexism by training students in peer-education skills focused on lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, and questioning (LGBTQ) issues.  Students become peer educators, providing workshop activities throughout the year on campus.   Approved for WGS major public engagement requirement.

WGS 380 Sexuality, Law and Power (3 hr)
Shannon Gilreath
Tuesday/Thursday  2:00-3:15 pm

Fall 2012

This course will explore a wide variety of issues related to sexual identity and orientation, particularly as those issues continue to push the law to address the wide variations of patterns in which human being relate. The course will look at the law as it both constricts societal development at times, and acts as a catalyst for radical social change at other times. We will look at the ways in which religion and popular morality shape the law and, in some instances, are shaped by it.

WGS 377C Special Topic: Queer Public Histories (3 hr)
Angela Mazaris

Spring 2012

This hands-on course explores how public history projects (oral histories, museums, archives, documentaries) document gay, lesbian, and queer communities in the U.S. We will discuss how historical and contemporary LGBTQ stories have been collected, and we will examine the various queer identities that emerge through this process. Same as HST 311A-B.

SOC 309 Sexuality and Society: Sociology of Sexuality (3 hr)
Catherine Harnois

Spring 2012

This course will draw from sociological, feminist, and queer theories to explore the social dimensions of sexuality. We will consider the processes through which sexuality is socially constructed and maintained, and how sexuality, as a social institution, relates to other social institutions such as gender, class, and race.

WGS 377C Special Topics: Lesbian and Gay Identities, Sexualities, and Cross-Cultural Translation (3 hr)
David Phillips
Fall 2011

This course provides an examination of the various LGBT identities that are created by mass media, literature, and film, and explores the transmission of mainstream models of identity across cultural boundaries.  It also investigates how stereotypes of sexual identities are perpetuated in cultures, and what leads to their revision.

WGS 321B/WGS 621BG Research Seminar: Gay and Lesbian Film and Culture (3 hr)
Gary Ljungquist
Fall 2009

This course analyzes the portrayal of gays and lesbians in film, and the ways in which film has created images of same-sex love and gay/lesbian identities.  Feminist and queer film theory are used to develop an analytical method for interpreting various types of films with special emphasis on New Queer Cinema. Same as COM 370D.  Counts for Media Studies Concentration in COM.  Counts toward FLM minor.

 

WGS 380A Sexuality and the Law (3 hr)
Shannon Gilreath
Fall 2009

This course will explore a wide variety of issues related to sexual identity and orientation, particularly as those issues continue to push the law to address the wide variations of patterns in which human beings relate.  The course will look at the law as it both constricts societal development at times, and acts as a catalyst for radical social change at other times.  We will look at the ways in which religion and popular morality shape the law and, in some instances, are shaped by it.